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Her Story

Basilia was born at the Del Real Palace in Valencia. She was the second daughter of King Eustorgio I of Valencia and Maria of Portugal. As a child, and following in her father’s footsteps, she showed great interest and aptitude in mathematics and the sciences and received an education typically reserved for males of the court. Basilia’s knowledge of astronomy and astrology became renowned throughout Europe, earning her the title of Learned. She was raised in the Catholic religion.

Concerned about the ability of his first-born daughter to effectively reign, King Eustorgio named Basilia as heir to the throne. Upon her father’s death, and on a date chosen with her astrologer, Basilia was crowned. Those opposed to her becoming sovereign plotted to depose her. Anticipating some dissent, Basilia quickly proved her ability to govern. Although she would later depend heavily on trusted advisers led by Clotaldo, Basilia chose to ignore the advice of her advisers, and went on her own to negotiate with the rebels. She was successful and the rebellion was quickly brought to an end.

 

Although plagued by personal tragedy, Basilia's reign will be remembered for the creation of the Taula de canvi (part bank, part stock exchange), which established Valencia as a center of Mediterranean trading and stabilized the kingdom's finances. Basilia married the third son of King Sigismund III of Poland, Prince Augustus. Prince Augustus died in a tragic accident in 1464. Despite seven pregnancies, Queen Basilia failed to present an heir to the throne.

 

In 1501, on the anniversary of her coronation, Queen Basilia faces the hardest and most important decision of her life; Who would inherit the throne?